WHO Stresses Isolation, Testing, Tracing As Backbone of Countries' COVID-19 Suppression Response

Linda Lacina, World Economic Forum |

Image: WHO Director-General Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus. Source: Christopher Black/WHO via World Economic Forum

Take every precaution. That was the message from a World Health Organization (WHO) briefing Wednesday, one that stressed the need for a comprehensive approach against the COVID-19 coronavirus, even for countries with just a few cases.

According to officials, more countries need to isolate, test and trace new cases to effectively suppress and control the virus' spread. This must be the "backbone of the response in every country", said the Director-General.

Countries that have used the "full package" of measures have been able to turn the tide, such as the Republic of Korea, said Director-General Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus.

The country educated, empowered and engaged communities, he said. It also expanded lab capacity and exhaustively performed contact tracing.

Where there had once been 800 cases, he said, there are now just 90. "It didn't surrender," said the Director-General.

Some countries that currently have only sporadic cases have not yet taken steps to cancel mass gatherings or enact social distancing. Those countries should not assume that community transmission will not come to their countries. "Don’t assume you won’t have transmission."

As the Director-General explained, the virus can accelerate after a tipping point. If you have no cases, he said, it is better to "cut it from the bud".

Communities should also not assume that the coronavirus is a disease that only the elderly face. Twenty-percent of deaths in South Korea were people under 60, said Michael J. Ryan, Chief Executive Director of the WHO Health Emergencies Programme. "Younger, healthier people can still experience severe symptoms," he said. "We must be very, very careful."

Suppression can buy time for additional measures to be developed to treat the infected. The first vaccine trial is under way, explained the officials. Additionally, many countries from Canada to Norway to Argentina have joined a new international Solidarity Trial to study how untested treatments compare.

Suppression can also buy time to ensure that additional tests and the equipment to run them can be manufactured for those who need them. It can also help ensure that the current shortage of face masks, gloves and other pieces of personal protection equipment can be addressed.

That suppression, however, will take extensive collaboration and coordination. "This virus is presenting as an unprecedented threat," explained the Director-General. "We can come together against a common enemy, an enemy against humanity."

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Linda Lacina is Digital Editor at the World Economic Forum.

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Source: World Economic Forum

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