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AP News | Equities.com |

Wall Street closed out its worst week since June with another day of churning trading Friday, as big technology stocks resumed their suddenly weakened ways.

The S&P 500 rose 1.78, or 0.1%, to 3,340.97, but only after a roller-coaster day where a gain of 0.9% gave way to a loss of 0.9%. It kept swinging up and down after that, the latest examples of the lightning-quick shifts in momentum that have rocked Wall Street recently. Through the tumultuous week, the S&P 500 lost 2.5% to clinch its its first back-to-back weekly loss in four months.

The Nasdaq composite, which includes many of the superstar tech stocks that have been the focus of the market’s recent selling, lost 66.05, or 0.6%, to 10,853.55 after also flip-flopping between gains and losses. Its 4.1% drop for the week was its worst since market panic was peaking about the coronavirus and stocks hit a bottom in late March.


AP News | Equities.com |

Technology and energy companies led a broad sell-off on Wall Street Thursday that wiped out nearly all of the market’s gains from a strong rally the day before.

The S&P 500 lost 1.8% after having been up briefly by 0.8% in the early going. The slide cut deeply into the benchmark index’s 2% gain on Wednesday. The latest gyrations follow a wild stretch where the S&P 500 careened from its worst three-day slump since June to its best day in nearly three months.

Tech stocks accounted for the biggest share of the broad sell-off. The sector has been at the center of the market’s swings, hurt by criticism that their recession-defying surge in recent months was overdone. The Nasdaq, which is full of tech stocks, slumped 10% from last Thursday through Tuesday and recovered for a 2.7% gain Wednesday. It lost most of that ground Thursday, falling 2% after shedding an early gain.


AP News | Equities.com |

Wall Street snapped back to life on Wednesday, recovering from its worst stretch of losses in months, as the bloodletting for big technology stocks came to at least a temporary halt.

Apple, Amazon and other tech companies that suddenly lost their momentum late last week on worries their stocks soared too high all regained some ground. They helped the S&P 500 rally 67.12, or 2%, to 3,398.96. It was the best day in three months for the index, which recovered a little more than a quarter of its losses from the prior three days.


AP News | Equities.com |

Big technology stocks tumbled again on Tuesday, continuing the Icarus-like flight path for companies that just a week ago were the high-flyers carrying Wall Street to record heights.

The S&P 500 fell 95.12, or 2.8%, to 3,331.84 and clinched its first three-day losing streak in nearly three months. Big names that were the main reasons for the market’s rocket ride back from its pandemic-caused losses were among the heaviest weights. Apple sank 6.7%, Microsoft pulled 5.4% lower and tech stocks across the index were down 4.6%.


David Nelson, CFA CMT | Equities.com |

The recent run up to all-time highs has been on weak breadth and narrow participation. While most equity sectors were hit hard last week it was technology that took the brunt of the selling as investors headed for the exits dumping high beta secular growth stocks. It's hard to know just what the trigger was and maybe that isn't important.

Asset Class Returns from Peak

The growth to value trade continued as investors headed for the exits dumping the dance partners that drove th...


AP News | Equities.com |

The stock market closed out its worst week in more than two months Friday as a second straight day of turbulent trading ended with more losses.

The S&P 500 fell 0.8% after clawing most of the way back from a 3.1% skid earlier in the day. Another slide in technology stocks, which led the selling a day earlier, pulled the market sharply lower for much of the day, though the selling eased by late afternoon.

The two-day sell-off handed the benchmark index its first weekly loss after five weeks of gains. Earlier in the week, the S&P 500 was notching all-time highs and posting its biggest increases in nearly two months.


AP News | Equities.com |

Wall Street’s euphoria took a break Thursday, as steep losses in technology stocks dragged the rest of the market down with them.

It was the biggest decline for the U.S. stock market since early June, when investors were dealing with a surge of coronavirus infections in places like Florida, Texas and Arizona. There seemed to be no explicit catalyst for the sell-off, with economic data coming in roughly where the market had expected and no companies issuing foreboding warnings.

That said, the market felt due for a breather, investors said. Both the S&P 500 and Nasdaq hit record highs just the day before. Prior to Thursday, the S&P 500 had risen nine out of the previous 10 days.


AP News | Equities.com |

The Dow Jones Industrial Average surged more than 450 points Wednesday as the stock market notched its best day in nearly two months.

The S&P 500 rose 1.5%, it’s best day since July 6. The benchmark index and the Nasdaq composite each hit new highs, extending Wall Street’s milestone-setting run in recent weeks.

Health care, technology and communications companies drove the rally. Technology stocks, which have led the market’s rebound this year, briefly stumbled in the early going, but gained strength into the afternoon. Energy companies fell as oil prices closed lower. Treasury yields were mixed.


AP News | Equities.com |

Wall Street kicked off September with another set of milestones Tuesday, as an afternoon rally carried the S&P 500 and Nasdaq composite to all-time highs.

The S&P 500 bounced back from a modest loss in the early going to finish 0.8% higher a day after the benchmark index wrapped up its fifth monthly gain in a row. More strength in technology stocks and solid gains in retailers and other companies that rely on consumers offset declines in health care companies and elsewhere in the market. Treasury yields fell.


AP News | Equities.com |

Stocks ended lower on Wall Street’s Monday, but the market still closed out August with its fifth monthly gain in a row.

The S&P 500 fell 0.2% after spending much of the day wavering between gains and losses of less than 0.1%. The modest decline, which snapped the index’s seven-day winning streak, came as losses in financial, industrial and energy companies outweighed gains in technology stocks.

The benchmark index finished the month with a 7% gain, making it the S&P 500′s best August since 1986. The Nasdaq composite, meanwhile, added to its recent string of milestones, closing at an all-time high.