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David Nelson, CFA CMT | Equities.com |

After a promising start, October ended in the red on the heels of a Washington failure to deliver a fiscal stimulus embraced by both economists and Federal Reserve Chair Jay Powell. A record 33% annualized GDP print for the third quarter doesn't mask the fact that, despite a significant economic recovery underway, America needs another bridge loan. We still have too many unemployed and even more underemployed as some companies are forced to lay off part of their work force. Close proximity busines...


AP News | Equities.com |

Wall Street closed out another punishing week Friday with the S&P 500 posting its first back-to-back monthly loss since the pandemic first gripped the economy in March.

The S&P 500 dropped 1.2% and ended the week with a 5.6% loss, its worst in seven months. Sharp drops in big technology stocks drove much of the selling, reflecting worries that expectations built too high for some of the market’s biggest stars, including Apple and Amazon. Investors have bid up shares in those and other Big Tech companies this year, anticipating they would deliver strong profits, but their latest results and uncertain outlooks left traders wanting.


AP News | Equities.com |

U.S. stocks shook off an early slide and closed broadly higher Thursday as the market steadied after its worst drop in more than four months.

The S&P 500 rose 1.2%, bouncing back from a drop of 0.3% in the early going. Traders welcomed encouraging data on the pace of layoffs and how powerfully the economy rebounded during the summer from its coronavirus-induced coma. Economists warn big challenges still lie ahead, though. The S&P 500 was coming off a 3.5% tumble Wednesday on worries the worsening pandemic will drag down the economy and corporate profits again.

A strong rebound in technology sector stocks helped power the rally ahead of widely anticipated quarterly report cards from Facebook, Amazon and Google’s parent company. The three Big Tech companies each reported results after the close of regular trading that topped Wall Street’s expectations.


AP News | Equities.com |

The Dow Jones Industrial Average sank 943 points Wednesday as surging coronavirus cases forced more shutdown measures in Europe and raised fears of more restrictions in the U.S.

The S&P 500 slid 3.5%, its third straight loss and its biggest drop since June. The benchmark index is already down 5.6% this week, on track for its biggest weekly decline since March. That’s when the market was in the midst of selling off as strict lockdowns around the world choked the economy into recession.

Investors are growing increasingly anxious that the economy will lose momentum should more shutdowns be imposed just as prospects for more economic support from Washington have dwindled as Election Day nears.


AP News | Equities.com |

Wall Street’s losses mounted for the second straight day Tuesday as momentum slows on worries about rising virus counts and Washington’s inability to deliver more aid to the economy.

The S&P 500 fell 0.3% after spending much of the day swinging between small gains and losses. Most of the stocks in the index fell, particularly banks, oil producers and other companies whose profits tend to track the strength of the economy. Those losses outweighed gains in technology stocks and companies that rely on consumer spending. Traders also welcomed news that AMD has agreed to buy fellow chipmaker Xilinx for $35 billion.


AP News | Equities.com |

U.S. stocks fell sharply Monday, deepening last week’s losses, as a troubling increase in coronavirus counts put investors in a selling mood. The skid came as doubts mount on Wall Street that Washington will come through with more stimulus for the economy before Election Day.

The S&P 500 slid 1.9%, its biggest single-day decline in more than a month. The Dow Jones Industrial Average dropped 650 points after having been down more than 960 during the heaviest selling. Technology companies drove much of the broad sell-off, though losses in communications services, financial and industrial stocks helped weigh down the market. Energy stocks also dropped in tandem with crude oil prices.


David Nelson, CFA CMT | Equities.com |

The political noise surrounding an election creates unique challenges for professional and retail investors. Debates, election commercials, talking heads and the media will paint political ideology for the investor to consider. Truth rarely lives on the extremes and as analysts and investors it is important to keep our eye on the ball and what drives long term equity returns.

Unless we're about to unwind hundreds of years of economic data and history, long-term equity perform...


AP News | Equities.com |

U.S. stock indexes closed mostly higher Friday, though the S&P 500 posted its first weekly loss in four weeks.

The benchmark index eked out a 0.3% gain after another day of wobbly trading. The Dow Jones Industrial average finished with a small loss. Gains in communication services, health care and other sectors outweighed a decline in technology and energy companies. Treasury yields remained near their highest levels since June.


AP News | Equities.com |

U.S. stocks overcame a wobbly start to finish higher Thursday, as traders welcomed more corporate quarterly results for the summer that weren’t as bad as Wall Street feared.

The S&P 500 rose 0.5% after shifting between small gains and losses throughout the morning. The index recouped all of its losses from a day earlier, but remains on track for its first weekly loss after notching a gain in each of the previous three weeks.


AP News | Equities.com |