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Marriott International Inc, the world’s largest hotel company, and the Blue Cross Blue Shield Association (BCBSA) said Sunday they will suspend donations to U.S. lawmakers who voted against certifying President-elect Joe Biden’s victory last week.

“We have taken the destructive events at the Capitol to undermine a legitimate and fair election into consideration and will be pausing political giving from our Political Action Committee to those who voted against certification of the election,” Marriott spokeswoman Connie Kim said, confirming a report in Popular Information, a political newsletter.


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Apple Inc and Amazon.com Inc have suspended Parler from their respective App Store and web hosting service, saying the social networking service popular with many right-leaning social media users has not taken adequate measures to prevent the spread of posts inciting violence.

The action by Apple and Amazon follows a similar move by Alphabet Inc’s Google on Friday. Parler is favored by many supporters of U.S. President Donald Trump, who was permanently suspended from Twitter on Friday, and it is seen as a haven for people expelled from Twitter.


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Deutsche Bank AG will pay nearly $125 million to avoid U.S. prosecution on charges it engaged in foreign bribery schemes and manipulated precious metals markets, the latest blow for the bank as it tries to rebound from a series of scandals.

Germany’s largest lender agreed to the payout as it entered a three-year deferred prosecution agreement with the U.S. Department of Justice, and a related civil settlement with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission.

Almost all of the payout relates to charges Deutsche Bank violated the federal Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) over its dealings in Saudi Arabia, Abu Dhabi, China and Italy, court papers show. Nearly two-thirds of the payout is a criminal fine.


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Tesla Inc launched a cheaper variant of the Model Y, bringing its sports utility vehicle’s price closer to that of its Model 3 sedan, the electric-car maker’s least expensive car.

The new standard range Model Y is priced at $41,990, only $4,000 more than the entry level Model 3, according to the company’s website.

Shares of the carmaker, which have surged more than 700% in 2020, were up 7.8% to $879.72 at 11:45am ET on Friday.

Tesla’s stratospheric rally has helped Chief Executive Officer Elon Musk surpass Amazon.com Inc’s top boss Jeff Bezos to become the world’s richest man, Bloomberg News reported on Thursday.


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The UK’s competition watchdog said on Friday it has launched an investigation into Google’s proposals to remove third-party cookies and other functions from its Chrome browser, following concerns the move could curb rival digital advertising.

The investigation will assess whether the proposals could cause advertising spend to become even more concentrated on the ecosystem of Alphabet’s Google at the expense of its competitors, the Competition and Markets Authority said.

Google has said the technology, referred to as the ‘Privacy Sandbox’ project, will allow people to receive relevant ads, helping to sustain the current advertising model without tracking users on an individual level.


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Japan’s NEC Corp has launched a facial recognition system that identifies people even when they are wearing masks, adapting to a new normal where face coverings have become a key form of protection against the spread of the coronavirus.

The technology firm had already been working on a system to meet the needs of allergy sufferers who wear masks - a common practice in Japan - when the COVID-19 pandemic prompted it to accelerate development.

“Needs grew even more due to the coronavirus situation as the state of emergency (last year) was continuing for a long time, and so we’ve now introduced this technology to the market,” Shinya Takashima, assistant manager of NEC’s digital platform division, told Reuters.


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South Korea’s Hyundai Motor Co said on Friday it was in early talks with Apple, after local media reported the firms were discussing an electric car and battery tie-up, sending Hyundai shares surging 25%.

The report comes weeks after Reuters reported that Apple was moving forward with self-driving car technology and was aiming to produce a passenger vehicle that could include its own breakthrough battery technology as early as 2024.

Earlier on Friday, Korea Economic Daily TV said the iPhone maker and Hyundai were in discussions to develop self-driving electric vehicles by 2027 and develop batteries at U.S. factories operated by either Hyundai or its affiliate Kia Motors Corp. The broadcaster didn’t cite sources.


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U.S. online lending startup Social Finance Inc (SoFi) said on Thursday it has agreed to go public through a merger with Social Capital Hedosophia Holdings Corp V, a blank-check acquisition company led by venture capital investor Chamath Palihapitiya.

The deal values SoFi at around $8.65 billion and is expected to provide up to $2.4 billion in cash proceeds to the San Francisco-based company.

Reuters had reported earlier on Thursday that SoFi and Social Capital were nearing a deal to merge. Shares of Social Capital closed up 58% at $19.17 apiece.


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Conagra Brands Inc on Thursday forecast current-quarter profit above Wall Street estimates, betting on continued demand for its frozen dinners, cake mixes and snacks as the COVID-19 pandemic shows little sign of easing.

However, shares of the Chicago-based company fell 3% in noon trading after quarterly sales came in line with expectations.

“This was just an OK quarter,” John Boylan, senior equity analyst at Edward Jones said. “Sales merely matched expectations despite more people eating at home, inventory replenishment at grocery stores and improvements in its supply chains,” he added.


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Boeing Co will pay over $2.5 billion to resolve the U.S. Justice Department’s investigation into two deadly 737 MAX crashes that killed 346 people, the Justice Department said, but will not be forced to plead guilty to criminal charges.

The Justice Department said the settlement includes a criminal monetary penalty of $243.6 million, compensation payments to Boeing’s 737 MAX airline customers of $1.77 billion, and the establishment of a $500 million crash-victim beneficiaries fund to compensate the heirs, relatives, and legal beneficiaries of the passengers.